GM and UAW negotiations revolve around retiree health care trust

2009-pontiac-g6

This should be a pretty eventful week in the auto industry.

The terms of the federal loans set “targets” for concessions, largely from debt-holders and the United Auto Workers union, but concession talks have made little progress with just a couple of days left before the initial deadline.

Negotiations between GM and the UAW broke off Friday night but resumed Sunday, still focusing on exchanging the company’s cash payments into a union-run retiree health care trust for GM stock, according to a person briefed on the talks who didn’t want to be identified because the bargaining is private.

GM and UAW officials declined comment.

GM and Chrysler do not need to have everything nailed down for Tuesday’s progress reports, but the companies are expected to detail concessions along with plant closures, the potential elimination of brands and thousands of job cuts.

After Tuesday there will be several weeks of intense negotiations ahead of a March 31 deadline for the final versions of the plans.

  

Bondholders starting to squeeze GM

The Detroit News is reporting the GM bondholers are driving a hard bargain and threatening to push GM into bankruptcy.

General Motors Corp. bondholders want more money in exchange for forgiving billions in debt and are threatening to push the struggling automaker into bankruptcy if they don’t get it, The Detroit News has learned.

GM has been negotiating with bondholders this week on a complicated debt exchange that would cut the automaker’s unsecured debt by two-thirds to $9.2 billion. To get there, bondholders would have to accept about 30 cents on the dollar, which is a requirement of the automaker’s $13.4 billion federal loan package.

But bondholders are demanding 50 cents on the dollar, which they say mirrors the value of concessions being negotiated with the United Auto Workers, said people familiar with the talks.

The demands illustrate the challenges GM is facing in its talks with bondholders and raise doubts about whether the company will succeed in cutting its debt and convincing the government it can repay the loans. If GM cannot reach a deal on concessions with bondholders, as well as with the UAW, the government could recall the $9.4 billion GM has already received and effectively force the automaker into bankruptcy.

  

Related Posts