Eye candy still helps sell cars

The auto industry is always evolving, but some things never change. A commitment to style and beauty has always been an important aspect of the business, and brands like Ferrari, BMW and Lamborghini are examples of brands that embrace this ethos.

With the beauty of cars often comes beautiful women as well. As you can see from the photo above from the 2011 Frankfurt Motor Show, many brands understand this connection very well. This photo has two models in the Lamborghini display. Now that Chrysler is owned by Fiat, you have this trend reappearing in the United States as well with all of their brands. Some brands are more conservative, but you wonder if they’re missing something.

The result is that the car business keeps the calendar printing business going, as calendars featuring stylish cars with attractive models never seem to go out of style. While much of the marketing and PR business has gone digital, beautifully printed brochures and calendars are still an important part of the equation. And for some, it’s a great business as these calendars never go out of style.

  

Lamborghini and Italian models at the Frankfurt Motor Show

The Frankfurt Motor Show is huge, with countless exhibit halls filled with new cars and concept vehicles. Lamborghini had one of the smaller exhibits, but they got plenty of attention a red Lamborghini Gallardo LP570-4 Super Trofeo Stradale that they unveiled at the show along with two beautiful Aventadors in white and metallic gray.

Read the full article and check out the entire gallery at Bullz-Eye.com!

  

2011 Car Review: Lamborghini Aventador LP700-4

Joe Gustafson reviews the 2011 Lamborghini Aventador LP700-4 for Bullz-Eye.com. Read what he has to say about this impressive ride below.

Lamborghini is a company founded on a grudge. The founder, Ferrucio Lamborghini, set out to build a more reliable, comfortable supercar after being insulted by Enzo Ferrari while trying to have his Ferrari 250GT serviced. Nearly 50 years later, his company has released what may be the ultimate expression of his original vision: the Lamborghini Aventador LP700-4. The Aventador LP700-4 communicates Ferrucio’s vision of a reliable, exciting supercar built for the road while rekindling the traditions of previous Lamborghinis.

Exterior
Lamborghinis have been about style as much as they are about speed. The Miura was the first Lamborghini supercar. In fact, many believe it was the first “supercar” period. Designed by Bertone, it began the wedge-shape trend of later Lamborghinis. However, Lambo became too avant-garde with such models as the Countach, softened to the point of blandness by the Diablo, and too tacky with the Murcielago. The Aventador, however, continues the tradition of the wedge-shaped Lamborghini, but brings that shape back to a more organic form, as seen in the Miura, rather than the purely geometrical ones seen on the Countach, Diablo and Murcielago.

Even though the Aventador references the style of the Miura, it is still connected to recent Lamborghinis with a few key geometric elements. In Lamborghini tradition, the Aventador is a long, low, and wide car, a land-going ICBM missile. The front features elements of the Murcielago, but the edges are softened in places like the fender and grill openings. The headlights have also been toned down to give the car a more mature look that still manages to look intimidating. Also, like the Countach, the sides of the car feature prominent air intakes, and like the limited production Reventon, the back end scowls at you through narrow taillights and large grilles. The overall effect is the first traditionally beautiful Lamborghini since the Mura, but is still aggressive in appearance. It may be the first gentleman’s Lamborghini ever – Ed Hardy aficionados.

Read the full review.

  

Is there a Lamborghini in your future?

From the Detroit Bureau.com:

When the new Lamborghini Aventador was introduced, earlier this year, it included a feature that allows a driver to slightly raise the nose to prevent the front wing from scraping on speed bumps or steep driveways.

For the Italian maker, that’s about as big a concession as it has ever made for day-to-day driving – most owners pulling their Gallardos and Murcielagos out of the garage only on weekends or special occasions.

But that’s about to change, according to Lamborghini CEO Stephan Winkelmann, who has confirmed an earlier report in TheDetroitBureau.com that the maker is developing what he has dubbed “an everyday car.”

“We are going to have a third model,” the German-born, Italian-reared executive announced during a conference sponsored by the Reuters news service. “It has to be an everyday car. We want to have a car which is able to be used on a daily basis.”

Read the full article.

  

Lamborghini Estoque vs. SVS Codatronca TS

Autoblog pits the Lamborghini Estoque versus the SVS Codatronca TS and lets you be the judge of the better ride!

We here at Autoblog have millions of kilograms, nay liters and liters, of respect for our friends at Automobili Lamborghini, and the upcoming Aventador will no doubt alter our lives when we drive it. We also root hard for the little shops in and around Turin that changed the world of car design in the 1950s, ’60s, and ’70s, and nobly carry on today as best they can.

We were recently going through various photos and started juxtaposing the front end of the Lamborghini Estoque sedan concept seen at the 2008 Paris Motor Show with that of the one-off SVS Codatronca Turismo Sportivo (or TS). The latter was developed near Turin between 2005 and 2008 by the small shop named SpadaConcept SpadaVettureSport, led by legendary designer Ercole Spada and his son Paolo. The latter carrozzeria just unveiled their roofless 710-horsepower barchetta version at the Top Marques Monaco show, called the Codatronca Monza. All Codatronca models so far are based on a supercharged Corvette Z06 chassis (it makes sense that we also see a little bit of 1967-1982 C3 in there, too).


Read the full article.

  

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